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Thursday July 07, 2022

Russia steps up battle for eastern Ukraine

By AFP
May 29, 2022

KRAMATORSK, Ukraine: Russia pressed its onslaught on eastern Ukraine on Saturday, saying it had captured the strategic town of Lyman and had successfully tested hypersonic missiles in the Arctic.

Ukrainian forces battled to repel Russian forces from the outskirts of the key city of Severodonetsk, a Ukrainian official said, however denying claims it had been surrounded.

Russia is waging all-out war for the eastern Donbas region -- Ukraine’s industrial heartland where President Volodymyr Zelensky has accused Moscow of carrying out a "genocide".

"The town of Krasny Liman has been entirely liberated from Ukrainian nationalists," the Russian defence ministry said, using the Russian name for Lyman and confirming an announcement made a day earlier by pro-Moscow separatists. Lyman lies on the road to the urban centres of Severodonetsk and Kramatorsk.

Russian forces have been closing in on Severodonetsk and nearby Lysychansk in Lugansk province, with conflicting reports about the extent of their advance.

Regional governor Sergiy Gaiday said Russian shelling continued on Severodonetsk as Ukrainian soldiers fought to oust the invading forces from a hotel on its edges, but rejected claims the city had been completely encircled.

"Severodonetsk has not been cut off... there is still the possibility to deliver humanitarian aid," he told Ukrainian television.

A Lugansk police official, cited by Russia’s state news agency RIA Novosti, late Friday said Severodonetsk was "now surrounded" and Ukrainian troops could no longer leave the city.

Three months after Russia launched its invasion on February 24, leaving thousands dead on both sides and forcing 6.6 million people out of the country, Moscow has gained control over swathes of eastern and southern Ukraine, including port cities Kherson and Mariupol.

Other Ukrainian ports have been cut off from the world by Russian warships, preventing key grain supplies from being transported out. Russia and Ukraine supply about 30 percent of the wheat traded on global markets.

Russia has tightened its own exports and Ukraine has vast amounts stuck in storage, driving up prices and cutting availability for importers across the globe.

President Vladimir Putin has repeatedly rejected any responsibility, instead blaming Western sanctions.

But on Saturday he told French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz Russia was "ready" to look for ways to allow more wheat onto the global market.

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