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May 12, 2021

PAL holds Brahvi Mushaira

 
May 12, 2021

Islamabad : An online Brahvi International 'Hamdiya & Naatiya Mushaira' was organised by the Pakistan Academy of Letters (PAL). Mushaira presided over by Johar Brahvi (Dadu).

Prof. Abdul Razzaq Sabir (Quetta) was the chief guest. Noor Khan Mohammad Hassani (Quetta), Prof. Susan Brahvi (Quetta), Ustad Mehboob Aajez (Qatar) and Sail Mengal (Qatar) were the guests of honor.

Dr. Yousuf Khushk, Chairman, PAL, gave the introductory speech. Qayyum Bedar (Quetta) and Nazir Shakir Brahvi (Shikarpur) were the moderators. Poets from all over the country and abroad recited ‘Hamdiya and Naatiya’ poetry.

Dr. Yousuf Khushk, Chairman, PAL, in his introductory remarks, said that Brahvi, like other Pakistani languages, has a tradition of Hamad from ancient times. Hamad is present in everything from folk literature to modern Brahvi poetry as a special creation and a spirit of devotion. If we look at the tradition of Hamad and ‘Naat’ in Brahvi literature, then ‘Naat’ has been a part of our folklore, classical literature and ancient poetic tradition.

‘Hamd and Naat’ were first found in written literature in Malik Dad Kalati's book ‘Tahafta-e-Ajaib’ (1760) and then in 1870 by Maulana Abdul Hakim Mashwani. The dictionary appears in a good color in the Brahvi section of the Diwan ‘Char Bagh’. An excellent example of divine love and love of the Prophet can be seen in the words of the famous Brahvi Sufi poet Taj Muhammad Tajal. Tajal’s poetry exists for the color of Sufism. We see a clear glimpse of Fana Fi Allah and Fana Fi Rasool in the words of Taj Muhammad Tajil as well as in the words of Faiz Muhammad Faizal Faqir.

He said that adopting the tradition of ‘Hamad and Naat’ from the scholars of such Maktab Durkhani, he regularly published books on Naatiya poetry. These include Abdul Majeed Choloi 's book ‘Josh Habib’, Maulana Muhammad Omar Din Puri's book ‘Shamail Sharif’, ‘Mushtaq-e- Madina’, ‘Fi Al-Faraq’, ‘Baiz-ul-Tayyib’, ‘Fi Zikr-e-Habib’ and other books.

He said that similarly, another scholar of Maktab-e-Durkhani is Maulana Nabu Jan's ‘Tohfat-ul-Gharaib’ and ‘Naseehat Nama’. In addition to other books by Brahvi's first female poetess, ‘Mai Taj Bano’, her book, ‘Tasweekh- ul-Niswan’, also contains ‘Naatiya’ poems.

He said that similarly this tradition is present in the poets of post-Pakistan with great devotion. He said that every book of Brahvi's poetry in any genre of poetry begins with ‘Hamadiya and Naatiya’ poetry.

Poets in Brahvi who have published regular books on Hamad-o-Naat recitation among them are Allama Johar Brahvi's book ‘Roshanai’, Pearl Zubairani's book ‘Tajalli’, Gham Khwar Hayat's book ‘Wird’, Abdul Samad Sorabi's translated book ‘Fakhr-e- Koneen’, Muhammad Ali Shah's ‘Khushbo Nasfar’ and the book 'Naat Na Safar’ with reference to the history and tradition of Naat recitation, Hussain Bakhsh Sajid's book 'Tajla Noorna', Zia Jan's collection 'Dur-e-Arab', Maulana Rashid Hamdam's' Bakhtawara Tosha ', Khalid Asir's' ‘Sartaj Madina’ and others.

He said that apart from this, the modern and Naat-speaking poet of Brahvi, Sabir Nadeem, has done significant work in poetry based on the names of the Holy Prophet (PBUH) apart from the Hamad and Naat.