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AFP
July 3, 2020

WI cricket’s ‘founding father’ Everton Weekes dies

Sports

AFP
July 3, 2020

ST. JOHN’S, Antigua and Barbuda: Legendary batsman Everton Weekes, the last of the famed West Indies ‘Three Ws’, died Wednesday at the age of 95 and was hailed as “a founding father” of the sport in the Caribbean.

“Our hearts are heavy as we mourn the loss of an icon. A legend, our hero, Sir Everton Weekes,” tweeted Cricket West Indies.

“Our condolences go out to his family, friends and many fans around the world. May he rest in peace.”

Barbadian Weekes was part of a feared post-World War II West Indies team which also featured Clyde Walcott and Frank Worrell.

Walcott died in 2006 while Worrell passed away in 1967. All three had been born within a mile and a half of each other over an 18-month period.

Today, the national stadium in Bridgetown is named the Three Ws Oval.

Weekes played 48 Tests between 1948 and 1958, scoring 4,455 runs at an average of 58.61. His highest Test score was 207.

“A most amazing pioneer in West Indies cricket,” said CWI president Ricky Skerritt.

“A tremendous gentleman and a wonderful human being. He was literally a founding father of our cricket. May he rest in peace.”

Weekes made his mark in the fourth Test against England in Jamaica in 1948 where he crashed an attack that included Gubby Allen, Maurice Tremlett and Jim Laker for 141, leading to a 10-wicket win.

When the West Indies went on to tour India later in the year, he produced successive innings of 128 in Delhi, 194 in Bombay and 162 and 101 in Calcutta.

He ought to have had a sixth consecutive hundred but was run out for 90 in Madras, a decision that Walcott described as “rather doubtful”.