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Xinhua
July 1, 2019

Grim water crisis: Indian govt mulling over halting residential construction

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Xinhua
July 1, 2019

MUMBAI: Water scarcity in India is turning into a grave crisis leading to a possible halting of residential construction in some cities and rising migration in rural areas due to farm distress.

In Bengaluru, capital of Karnataka state, the situation has worsened to such an extent that the state government is contemplating a ban on construction of new apartments in Bengaluru to combat the water shortage.

According to one state minister for Karnataka, there is no assurance of providing drinking water or other basic amenities while selling residential apartments in the city. Even provided to these apartments, the quality of water is poor, and most of these apartments depend on borewells or getting water delivered by tankers that is drawn from unclean lakes, which could pose a health risk as well, said reports quoting the minister.

Further down South, 346km from Bengaluru is the city of Chennai — capital of Tamil Nadu district where the scenario is no different with the city facing the worst water crisis.

Water crisis in Chennai is attributed to over exploitation of existing resources along with rapid rate of migration and unplanned growth.

After 18 years, railway wagons will be pressed into service to transport water to Chennai from another district. Chennai’s water requirement is 830 million liters a day and the state government claimed that it is now supplying 530 million liters a day from the four primary reservoirs that are on the verge of going dry.

Upwards North, the Nashik district located 166km from Mumbai — in India’s Western state of Maharashtra, has seen depleting ground water levels despite good rainfall every year and being home to some major rivers that supply water to the country’s financial capital.

Experts attributed the water crisis in India, ranked 120th among 122 countries in the water quality index to global warming, tree cutting and urbanisation.

The grim scenario had led to rising migration in Nashik district leaving several villages with only old people and young children left behind to fend for themselves.

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