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Tuesday April 16, 2024

Ashrafi urges pilgrims to follow Saudi Arabia’s laws during sacred journey

It was a journey of spiritual enlightenment, a communion with divine, not a platform for worldly agendas: says Ashrafi

By Asim Yasin
February 28, 2024
Chairman Pakistan Ulema Council, Hafiz Muhammad Tahir Mahmood Ashrafi addresses a press conference with the Ulema and Mashaikh on February 14, 2024. — NNI
Chairman Pakistan Ulema Council, Hafiz Muhammad Tahir Mahmood Ashrafi addresses a press conference with the Ulema and Mashaikh on February 14, 2024. — NNI

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan Ulema Council (PUC) Chairman Hafiz Muhammad Tahir Mehmood Ashrafi on Tuesday urged the pilgrims to follow the codal formalities of Saudi Arabia in letter and spirit during sacred journey.

Talking to media on Tuesday, Ashrafi emphasized that the Two Holy Mosques were places of worship alone and they were not arenas for political expression or displays of nationalism. “Raising slogans, flags, or engaging in any other irrelevant activity is not allowed within these hallowed walls,” he proclaimed.

Ashrafi said in the heart of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, where the sands of time meet the echoes of eternity, stood the Two Holy Mosques in Makkah and Medina, revered by millions as the holiest sites in Islam. “Guarding the sanctity of these sacred grounds was not just a duty but a profound responsibility of all of us to oversee the affairs of these revered places,” he maintained.

Reminding the true purpose of pilgrimage, Ashrafi said it was a journey of spiritual enlightenment, a communion with the divine, not a platform for worldly agendas.

He remained steadfast in his commitment to uphold the purity of the holy sites. Through education and outreach, he sought to instill in worshippers a deep reverence for the sanctity of these sacred places, reminding them of their sacred duty to preserve and protect these sacred spaces for generations to come.

He said the Two Holy Mosques stood as beacons of light in a world shrouded in darkness. “They were not just monuments of stone but symbols of hope, unity, and faith—a testament to the enduring power of devotion in an ever-changing world,” he added.