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May 23, 2020

Coronavirus affects Pindiites’ lifestyle

Islamabad

May 23, 2020

The lockdown imposed to arrest the spread of the deadly coronavirus outbreak has changed the whole lifestyle of Rawalpindi city residents.

“Parents are also strictly following the advice of doctors and psychologists on TV channels and social media platforms. They are using the quarantine period to develop stronger emotional connection with their children along with taking care of the tasks such as food preparation for them,” says Shama Zaidi.

Sadia Batool, a mother says: My teenage daughter has increasingly began displaying curiosity in household errands such as cleaning and ironing clothes. Now she takes care of the entire household work, which includes sweeping, mopping, washing clothes, drying and organizing washed dishes.”

“In addition to such silver lining in these gloomy times, several young boys are helping others. Elders are seen either guiding others or glued to television and mobile sets. Yet lots of youngsters who otherwise spend their time going to schools studying and roaming the streets of the city are flying kites these days on the rooftop of their houses,” adds Sadia Batool.

“Nobody bothers that flying of kites may lead to the spread of coronavirus among people, including children. Strict lockdown orders have been placed across the nation, to contain the spread of COVID-19 and this has led to a lot many people flying kites on the roofs of their houses, says Sundas Raza.

“According to what the authorities say, the passing of kites from one person to another is very likely to carry the COVID-19 infection along, which may lead to a rise in the number of coronavirus positive cases,” says Najaf Ali.

“Citing other reasons, the authorities have also said flying of kites at some places leads to threads getting entangled with electric wires. This has led to several cases of short circuit,” adds Najaf.

“Lack of enforcement by the administration and absence of guidance by the parents is said to have paved the way for youths and children to fly kites on the rooftops of their houses across the city flouting the restrictions. Hundreds of kites can be seen flying in the sky of the city in violation of the regulations imposed by the administration,” laments Jamal Shah.

Rahat Ali says: “Despite prohibition, strings coated with powdered glass, threads of plastic, cotton and nylon are sold. Unrestricted and unsafe kite flying has posed serious threat to human beings especially children. There is no ban on the use of dangerous strings.”

“The 12-year-old identified as Munna in the Fazal Town Phase-I fell down from the rooftop leading to fracture. Despite some incidents, I think during this dismal period let the people fly kites and have some fun. Let the city reverberate with the sounds of Bokaata,” says Haider.