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Thursday July 25, 2024

Prince Harry could not stop crying at King Charles' unexpected move: 'no right'

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex leased a property in the Cotswolds for two years

By Web Desk
June 13, 2024
After their wedding, Harry and Meghan moved into Frogmore Cottage in Windsor

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle once had a home in the United Kingdom valued at £2.5 million, but reports indicate they had to relinquish it.

According to sources, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex leased a property in the Cotswolds for two years. They reportedly signed the lease shortly before their wedding in May 2018.

After their wedding, Harry and Meghan moved into Frogmore Cottage in Windsor, which they renovated. However, while waiting for renovations to be completed, they are said to have stayed at the Oxfordshire property, valued at over £2.5 million in 2018.

A friend of the couple previously mentioned that they "enjoyed walking their dogs there and hosting their friends in complete privacy" at the Oxfordshire residence. Reports suggest they entertained guests like George and Amal Clooney during their time there.

Last summer, Prince Harry and Meghan were required to vacate Frogmore Cottage. They left their Windsor residence and England entirely in 2020 when they stepped down from their senior roles as working royals and moved to America.

Harry wrote in his memoir of Frogmore: "Once upon a time, this was going to be my forever home. Instead, it had proved to be just another brief stop."

Following the publication of his bombshell memoir, the Sussexes were told to depart the cottage for good - meaning they would no longer have any residence in the UK. At the time, a representative confirmed: "We can confirm the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been requested to vacate their residence at Frogmore Cottage."

Speaking exclusively to The Mirror earlier this year, royal biographer Tom Quinn said: "Harry was absolutely furious and in tears about being evicted from Frogmore he felt his father had no right to do it and that it was purely vindictive.

"Harry couldn't see that choosing to stop being a working royal would inevitably mean being deprived of his royal residence."