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Entertainment

Web Desk
September 18, 2020

Prince Harry felt ‘broken’ after security breach in the army delivered him back in the UK

Entertainment

Web Desk
Fri, Sep 18, 2020
Prince Harry felt ‘broken’ after security breach in the army delivered him back in the UK

Prince Harry never fully recovered from that one painful moment where he was forced to leave his army comrades to fend for themselves, following a major security breach that revealed his exact location in the Middle East.

It was reportedly the “toughest decision” the royal ever had to make. For the unversed, the reason the prince’s location was ousted was because of an Australian publication that wrote a piece on the prince’s whereabouts.

The incident was detailed in Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s autobiographical book Finding Freedom. Co-author Omid Scobie detailed the incident in the book, claiming, "Ten weeks into his 14-week tour of duty, an Australian tabloid breached the news embargo by revealing that Harry was secretly serving in Afghanistan. Evacuated from the war zone within the hour, a deflated Harry was met by his father and brother when he touched down at RAF Brize Norton back in the UK."

"While Harry described being 'broken' by the experience of leaving his soldiers not of his own accord, he almost immediately started working on making his way back to the front lines - this time as an Apache helicopter pilot."

The book went on to say, "Anger and anxiety started to bubble to the surface, and neither emotion fit into the official persona of a prince.”

"At royal engagements he suffered panic attacks. In the most proper and officious of settings, such as a reception by MapAction to mark Harry's new patronage of the humanitarian emergency response charity, the flight-or-fight instincts of an Apache helicopter pilot kicked in.

"A source remembers that when Harry left the event held at the Royal Society in London: 'He just started taking in deep breaths. ‘The people, the cameras, the attention, He had just let it get to him. He was on the edge.'"