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Entertainment

Web Desk
April 19, 2021

Demi Lovato criticises frozen yogurt shop for excessively diet-conscious options

Entertainment

Web Desk
Mon, Apr 19, 2021

Singer Demi Lovato put a LA-based frozen yogurt shop on blast after she was disappointed that their offerings were excessively diet-conscious.

The Skyscraper hit maker took a dig at The Bigg Chill on her Instagram Stories as she detailed her experience saying that it was very difficult to place an order as it gave an impression of promoting "disordered eating".

"Finding it extremely hard to order froyo from [The Bigg Chill] when you have to walk past tons of sugar-free cookies/other diet foods before you get to the counter," the 28-year-old said.

She urged the brand to "do better" and added the hashtag #dietculturevultures to make her point across.

"Do better please harmful messaging from brands or companies that perpetuate a society that not only enables but praises disordered eating."

The brand responded to the upset singer saying: "We are not diet vultures. We cater to all of our customers needs for the past 36 years. We are sorry you found this offensive."

Demi responded back: "Not just that. Your service was terrible. So rude. The whole experience was triggering and awful."

"You can carry things for other people while also carrying for another percentage of your customers who struggle DAILY just to even step foot in your store. You can find a way to provide an environment for all people with different needs. Including eating disorders – one of the deadliest mental illness only second to [opioid] overdoses. Don’t make excuses, just do better."

She went on to suggesting alternatives that the brand can adopt in order to cater to everybody.

"I was thinking, maybe it would help if you made it more clear that the sugar free options and vegan options are for that. Labeling the snacks for celiac or diabetes or vegans," she suggested.

"When it’s not super clear, the messaging gets confusing and being in LA it’s really hard to distinguish diet culture vs health needs. I think clear messaging would be more beneficial for everyone. You aren't wrong for catering to many different needs but it’s not about excluding one demographic to cater to others."