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World

Web Desk
May 14, 2019

Arundhati Roy hints Pulwama attack was a 'false flag' and 'intelligence failure'

World

Web Desk
Tue, May 14, 2019

India’s acclaimed writer Arundhati Roy opening up about the Pulwama attack on Monday hinted at it being a ‘false flag’ while also calling it a major intelligence failure.

During her interview with Democracy Now, the Man Booker Prize winner expressed her qualms about the incident that took place on February 14, subsequently surging tensions between India and Pakistan.

“Pulwama is a really big question mark, which we need to understand what actually happened. Because in Kashmir, historically, there have been many, many false flag attacks,” she stated.

Speaking about the intelligence failure in the region, the God of Small Things writer said: “I don’t even know what is Jaish-e-Mohammed anymore. Because the situation in Kashmir is that there are real terror groups, there are fake terror groups, there are penetrator terror groups. There was a massive intelligence failure, which even the governor of Kashmir spoke about. And then suddenly everyone went quiet.”

Moreover, the writer went on to question the motives of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi who was largely accused of capitalizing in on the Pulwama attack: “Modi [Indian prime minister] started campaigning using the pictures of the dead security forces, which was so terrible. And there’s absolutely no talk about the intelligence failure. How could it happen? How could so much RDX be smuggled in when people are just–people are stopped and checked while they’re going to buy milk? How did this happen? The convoy–the route of the convoy is always protected.”

Treading further on the strains that arose in the past three months between the two neighboring countries, Roy stated: “Well, let’s put it simply–that in April, India and Pakistan became the first nuclear-armed countries ever in history to bomb each other. So that should be enough reason for everybody to sit up and pay attention.”