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Sci-Tech

Web Desk
November 27, 2018

InSight: First pictures from Mars

Sci-Tech

Web Desk
Tue, Nov 27, 2018

Insight, NASA's spacecraft, landed on the red planet amid cheers and applause. It was the NASA's eight successful landing on Mars aimed at

listening for quakes and tremors as a way to unveil the Red Planet´s inner mysteries, how it formed billions of years ago and, by extension, how other rocky planets like Earth took shape.

"Ultimately, the day is coming when we land humans on Mars," NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said, adding that the goal is to do so by the mid 2030s.

The Insight spacecraft cost $993 million and took seven years from design to launch to landing, according to Reuters.

After landing successfully landing on  Mars, the  spacecraft has also sent  first images of the red plant.

"The Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA's InSight lander, took this picture of the Martian surface on Nov. 26, 2018, the same day the spacecraft touched down on the Red Planet. The camera's transparent dust cover is still on in this image, to prevent particulates kicked up during landing from settling on the camera's lens. This image was relayed from InSight to Earth via NASA's Odyssey spacecraft, currently orbiting Mars," NASA  posted this picture on its website with the caption.

A Twitter account created by the name of NASA InSight, shared an animated video which shows the lander 's  twin solar arrays opening  and  collecting sunlight on the surface of Mars.