close
Advertisement
Can't connect right now! retry

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!
 
February 14, 2021

Men argue, Nature acts

Lahore

 
February 14, 2021

Climate change isn’t an “issue” to add to the list of things to worry about, next to healthcare and taxes.

It is a civilisational wake-up call and a powerful message — spoken in the language of fires, floods, droughts, and extinctions—telling us that we need an entirely new economic model and way of sharing this planet. It’s high time we evolved. Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale. Without drastic action today, adapting to these impacts in the future will be more difficult and costly.

The situation of climate change is becoming desperate and everyone has to play their part in controlling it before it gets out of our hands. Most of the increase in global temperatures since 1950 has been caused by human activity. One of the most well-known effects of global warming is that sea ice and glaciers in the Arctic are melting. In 1910, the Glacier National Park in Montana in the United States was filled with approximately 150 glaciers. When the glaciers were recounted in 2017, this number had dropped to 26. This melting ice will cause rise in sea level, and will increasingly affect people in the areas that depend on water from melting glaciers for their drinking water. In the last 30 years, half of the world’s coral reefs have died. Human activity, as well as increased temperatures, has contributed significantly to coral bleaching. “Climate change is real. It is happening right now; it is the most urgent threat facing our entire species and we need to work collectively together and stop procrastinating.”

Whole parts of the globe will become too hot for human habitation and those left behind will die of heat. Diseases will increase and mutate. Food shortages will become chronic as we fail to move agriculture from one climate to another. Whole countries like Bangladesh and parts of other countries like Miami will be under water. Shortages of fresh water will affect humans and agriculture. The oceans will die, the air will get dirtier

Now that people have started taking climate change seriously and measures are being taken worldwide to ensure that this problem can be tackled with immediate effect. Respect for nature is fundamental. Governments must protect ecosystems key to fighting against climate change. Healing the natural system is the most feasible, realistic and fair option since it would benefit humanity and all species Governments can make a difference by supporting small local producers who, unlike large factory farms, employ sustainable practices, care about land restoration, benefit nearby communities, and make animals and crops more resilient to climate change In the fight against climate change, work aimed at reducing emissions, stopping their effects and diminishing future consequences is known as mitigation. It is important and very effective

If the people care about the environment and want to save themselves from a global catastrophe, these steps must be followed so that the problem of world crisis can easily be ended. Decisions should be made with the utmost urgency or else our fate will be in grave danger in the years to come! - Muhammad Talha Ijaz (The writer is a student of Aitchison College)