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Entertainment

Web Desk
September 27, 2020

Prince George gets a present from Sir David Attenborough, dating back 23 million years

Entertainment

Web Desk
Sun, Sep 27, 2020

As Prince William and Kate Middleton welcomed Sir David Attenborough into their homes, Prince George received a special present from their guest.

The visit included an outdoor screening of Sir David’s latest film, for which the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s children were also included.

Upon the occasion, Prince George, who is currently third in line to the throne, got a 23-million-year-old gift from Sir David, which he came across during his trip to Malta back in the 1960s.

After getting his hands on the fossil, Prince George seemed to be over the moon as shown in the pictures released by Kensington Palace on their official Instagram.

"The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are delighted to share new photographs of their family with David Attenborough," the caption read. 

"The photographs were taken earlier this week in the gardens of Kensington Palace, after The Duke and Sir David attended an outdoor screening of Sir David’s upcoming feature film. ‘David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet’."

"With a shared passion for protecting the natural world, they continue to support one another in their missions to tackle some of the biggest environmental challenges our planet faces," it further added.

"When they met, Sir David gave Prince George a tooth from a giant shark, the scientific name of which is carcharocles megalodon (‘big tooth’). Sir David found the tooth on a family holiday to Malta in the late 1960s, embedded in the island’s soft yellow limestone which was laid down during the Miocene period some 23 million years ago," wrote the palace.

"Carcharocles is believed to have grown to 15 metres in length, which is about twice the length of the Great White, the largest shark alive today," it was added.