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November 14, 2019

Celebrating a coup

Opinion

November 14, 2019

President Donald Trump celebrated a military coup in Bolivia that forced President Evo Morales, who recently won a fourth term, to resign on November 10.

“After nearly 14 years and his recent attempt to override the Bolivian constitution and the will of the people, Morales’ departure preserves democracy and paves the way for the Bolivian people to have their voices heard,” Trump declared. “The United States applauds the Bolivian people for demanding freedom and the Bolivian military for abiding by its oath to protect not just a single person, but Bolivia’s constitution.”

“These events send a strong signal to the illegitimate regimes in Venezuela and Nicaragua that democracy and the will of the people will always prevail. We are now one step closer to a completely democratic, prosperous, and free Western Hemisphere,” Trump added.

Moments after Trump’s statement praising the Bolivian military, Mexico announced it had granted Morales political asylum. Around two dozen lawmakers and officials from Bolivia already had sought refuge from Mexico.

Senator Bernie Sanders, a Democratic presidential candidate, and Representatives Ilhan Omar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez were some of the few American progressive politicians to condemn recent developments, but their statements did not have the same clarity as British Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn’s condemnation.

Corbyn reacted, “To see Evo Morales who, along with a powerful movement, has brought so much social progress forced from office by the military is appalling. I condemn this coup against the Bolivian people and stand with them for democracy, social justice and independence.”

General Williams Kaliman, leader of Bolivia’s armed forces, urged Morales to resign on November 10. Nonetheless, the US State Department, as well as the vast majority of the establishment press, contend Morales was not overthrown in a coup. They describe current events as a "power void" or "power vacuum."

On November 10, the New York Times wrote, "A leftist who had served longer than any other current head of state in Latin America, Mr. Morales lost his grip on power amid violent protests set off by a disputed election.” A CNN headline read, “Bolivian President Evo Morales steps down following accusations of election fraud."

Similarly, NPR went with the headline, “Bolivian President Evo Morales Resigns Amid Widespread Protests Over Election Fraud.” The Washington Post, which has made “opposing” the death of democracy in the darkness a part of their corporate brand, attributed Morales’ resignation to a “scathing election report.”

Excerpted from: 'Trump Applauds Bolivia’sMilitary Coup As USEstablishment Media Blame Morales For Turmoil' Commondreams.org

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