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Sports

Web Desk
November 13, 2019

Weightlifter Samia aims for gold, record at South Asian Games

Sports

Web Desk
Wed, Nov 13, 2019
The 25-year-old weightlifter does not let parenting hinder with her passion. Photo: TheNews 

LAHORE: Record holding weightlifter Saima Manzoor has aimed to win a gold medal and break records at the South Asian Games which will start from December 1 in Nepal.

The 25-year-old who boasts many records in the 55kg weight category, recently won a gold medal at the 33rd National Games before being selected for the South Asian Games. The national weightlifter said that she aims to bag a gold medal as well as break a record in the upcoming games.

"I have won gold at the National Games and now my next target is the South Asian Games. Not only do I intend on winning gold, I am aiming to break a record. I’m sure that I’ll succeed," she said.

Manzoor hails from a family of weightlifters. Her father, Muhammad Manzoor was a former Olympian and represented Pakistan at the 1976 Olympics. Added to this, he had competed in many national competitions.

Manzoor said that she drew her passion for the sport from her father and hoped that she would be able to represent the country in a positive manner.

"I am very fond of weightlifting and I want to be strong so that I can represent my country well," she said.

While Manzoor holds a steady weightlifting career, the mother of a six-year-old revealed that that her passion for the sport does not hinder her parenting duties.

"I am able to balance my domestic life as well as my professional career. Every day I manage to take my six-year-old son to school, pick him up and give him ample time for his studies. Throughout my day, I am able to take out three to four hours for training," she said.