close
Wednesday May 18, 2022

Record-breaking heat wave gripping India, Pakistan

Millions of the people in the areas of India and Pakistan where temperatures have remained in the triple digits (Fahrenheit) are now at risk of illness and death from the heat.

By News Desk
April 28, 2022

ISLAMABAD: A spring heat wave is scorching parts of Pakistan and India, with record-breaking April temperatures of 120 degrees Fahrenheit forecast along the border of the two countries in the coming days.

The extreme heat threatens the health of millions of people as well as the harvest of wheat at a time when climate change and the war in Ukraine have sparked a global food crisis. The Indian Meteorological Department warned this week that a heat dome, similar to the one that sent temperatures soaring over the Pacific Northwest last year, had formed over the region.

Millions of the people in the areas of India and Pakistan where temperatures have remained in the triple digits (Fahrenheit) are now at risk of illness and death from the heat. “It’s become impossible to work after 10 o’clock in the morning,” Sunil Das, who works as a rickshaw puller on the outskirts of Delhi, told Quartz India.

Following an exceptionally dry month of March, which also set a new temperature record, cities and towns across India’s wheat-growing region have been reporting temperatures over 100 degrees Fahrenheit this week. When April arrived, so did the heat wave, putting the wheat harvest at risk.

“The heat spell occurred very fast and also matured the crop at a faster pace, which shriveled the grain size. This also resulted in a drop in yield,” JDS Gill, the agriculture information officer in the state of Punjab, told India Today.

Meteorologists predicted that the temperature average for April would likely fall across large portions of India and Pakistan. Such severe heat waves aren’t normally registered in the region until May and June, but scientists have long warned that because of climate change they will become more common earlier and later in the coming decades. The temperature hit 116°F in the city of Dadu, Pakistan, tying a record for the warmest day in the Northern Hemisphere on that date. Temperatures are expected to keep rising this week.

The formation of a heat dome over India, Nepal and the Himalayas also has potentially worrisome long-term consequences, according to climate researchers. The consensus among scientists is that climate change has sped up the melting of glacier ice in the Himalayas.

Comments

    N K Ali commented 3 weeks ago

    Oof! This is terrible.How will the man on fields and streets survive? Salams

    1 0

    Muhammad Faizan commented 3 weeks ago

    Why you mention temperature in Fahrenheit when readers of this website are used to of Celsius

    5 0

    M. Saeed Awan commented 3 weeks ago

    Control population, check vehicle fitness and plant more trees.

    1 1

      omain commented 3 weeks ago

      easier said than done

    Kabira speaking commented 3 weeks ago

    Do not use the retarded F scale here, this isn't Murica

    0 0