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Karachi

August 8, 2016
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Diversity galore at 40-person group exhibition

Karachi

August 8, 2016

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Karachi

In an attempt to portray the limitlessness of art, works encompassing different styles and methods, of 40 artists, were being exhibited at the Clifton Art Gallery.

“I am very glad to observe such diversity in art, and the idea to put them all on display together is brilliant,” said Kamal Shah, a visitor at the gallery.

In one of his painting, artist Farrukh Shahab, depicts a Malang dressed up in rags standing bare footed. The use of orange colour illustrated the concept of charity while the green in the background represented the firmness in the character’s beliefs.

“I take myself to be a Malang so I could really relate with the artwork,” opined a visitor at the gallery.

With time art lost its grip over culture anda the space was filled by religious intolerance, class divisions and gender biasness; this was why the exhibition was organised, to restore art’s lost glory, said the gallery’s director Mohammad Rizwan Zakai.

Another artwork by renowned artist Ghulam Mustafa turned out to be a massive attraction for the audience owing to the artist’s remarkable use of ‘colour line’. The artist depicted a garden of daffodils typically seen in villages.

“I admire Ghulam Mustafa’s work; all his artworks are original,” said Maham an attendee at the gallery.

The artist in another piece illustrated a mosque in an abandoned piece of land depicting the reality of how Muslims have detached themselves from their roots.

Frame centrality is well maintained throughout the work which portrays the significance of the subjects.

The work of artist Eqbal Mehdi was also well received by visitors; specifically a sketch of a girl performing a classical dance.

His work takes a visitor back to pre-partition times where language, culture and traditions were wholeheartedly being observed.

The artist tried to convey a time of liberal values which was sadly not the case anymore. Mehdi made use of the gray scale marvellously, while shades of black gave it a vintage look.

“The artist knows the art of birthing characters. His canvas is full of life,” said Noreen Agha an art lover, a visitor at the gallery.

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