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The Dobermann – loyal, intelligent and alert

US
By US Desk
Fri, 06, 21

Dobermanns are known to be intelligent, alert, and tenaciously loyal companions and guard dogs....

BITS 'N' PIECES

The Dobermann or Doberman Pinscher is a medium-large breed of domestic dog that was originally developed around 1890 by Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann, a tax collector from Germany. The Dobermann has a long muzzle. It stands on its pads and is not usually heavy-footed. Ideally, they have an even and graceful gait. Traditionally, the ears were cropped and posted and the tail was docked. However, in some countries, these procedures are now illegal. Dobermanns have markings on the chest, paws/legs, muzzle, above the eyes, and underneath the tail.

Dobermanns are known to be intelligent, alert, and tenaciously loyal companions and guard dogs. Personality varies a great deal between each individual but, if taken care of and properly trained, they are generally considered to be loving and devoted companions. The Dobermann is driven, strong, and sometimes stubborn. With a consistent approach, they can be easy to train and will learn very quickly.

Poetry in motion

Ballet is a French word which had its origin in Italian balletto, a diminutive of ballo (dance) which comes from Latin ballo, ballare, meaning “to dance”, which in turn comes from the Greek (ballizo), “to dance, to jump about”. The word came into English usage from the French around 1630. It is a theatrical dance in which a formal academic dance technique — the danse d’école — is combined with other artistic elements such as music, costume and stage scenery. The academic technique itself is also known as ballet.

Ballet traces its origins to the Italian Renaissance, when it was developed as a court entertainment. During the 15th and 16th centuries the dance technique became formalized. The epicentre of the art moved to France following the marriage of the Italian-born aristocrat Catherine de Médici to Henry II of France. A court musician and choreographer named Balthasar de Beaujoyeulx devised Ballet comique de la reine (1581; “The Queen’s Comic Ballet”), which inaugurated a long tradition of court ballets in France that reached its peak under Louis XIV in the mid-17th century.

As a court entertainment, the works were performed by courtiers, and only a few professional dancers were occasionally participants. Louis XIII and his son Louis XIV frequently performed in them; the younger Louis was in time regarded as the epitome of the noble style of dancing as it developed at the French court.

Louis XIV established two academies: the Académie Royale de Danse (1661) and the Académie Royale de Musique (1669). The Académie Royale de Danse was formed to preserve the classical school of the noble dance. It was to last until the 1780s. By then its purpose essentially had been abrogated by the music academy, the predecessor of the dance school of the Paris Opéra.

Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950), Anna Pavlova (1881-1931), Galina Ulanova (1910-1998), Rudolf Nureyev (1938-1993) and Margot Fonteyn (1919-1991) are some of the best all time ballet dancers to-date.