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Wednesday May 22, 2024

Medical board to investigate PCB's handling of Ihsanullah's injury: Naqvi

Right-arm pacer has been out of action for months owing to his elbow injury and subsequent surgery last year

By Sports Desk
April 21, 2024
Right-arm pacer Ishanullah gestures during a Pakistan Super League match. — Facebook/Ihsan Ullah Khan/File
Right-arm pacer Ishanullah gestures during a Pakistan Super League match. — Facebook/Ihsan Ullah Khan/File

Days after the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) confirmed that pacer Ihsanulla had left for England for the treatment of his elbow injury, PCB Chairman Mohsin Naqvi Sunday announced that a medical panel will probe the handling of pacer's  injury.

The independent medical panel, comprising Dr Javed Akram, Dr Rana Dilawaiz and Dr Mumraiz Naqshband, will not only look into the conduct of the medical support team but will also suggest future course of action for the pacer's proper medical treatment, the PCB chief said in a statement on his official X account.

— X/@MohsinnaqviC42
— X/@MohsinnaqviC42

The development comes days after the board confirmed that Ishanullah had travelled to the UK to meet renowned orthopaedic surgeon Professor Adam Watts — who specialises in sports injuries including shoulder and elbow procedures.

The 21-year-old, who made his one-day international debut against New Zealand in April 2023, has been out of action for quite some time after undergoing surgery last year.

However, it seems the pacer is still facing issues with his elbow and will once again get surgery in England. The PCB, sources added, has made all the necessary arrangements for the pacer’s treatment and they will be supported by Pakistan Super League (PSL) franchise Multan Sultans’ owner Ali Tareen.

There have been questions regarding the way the PCB has treated the pacer’s injury even after it was initially misdiagnosed, as reported by ESPNcricinfo earlier.

However, PCB's medical department head Dr Sohail Saleem confirmed that there was no mishandling in Ihsanullah’s case.

"There was no mishandling in this case," Dr Saleem told ESPNcricinfo.

"I'll admit there was a delay [in the initial diagnosis], but no mishandling," he added.