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Pakistan

Web Desk
December 19, 2018

PM Imran Khan's chicken formula highlighted in Washington Post

Pakistan

Web Desk
Wed, Dec 19, 2018

Prime Minister Imran Khan’s anti-poverty program involving the chicken formula was met with extensive censure, however many experts believe the idea to be holding ample potential.

A report by The Washington Post, brings to light another side of the argument that stands in support of PM Khan’s formula of eradicating poverty through the provision of hens and roosters.

Citing the expert opinion of Poultry Research Institute’s director Abdul Rehman, the report reveals how the project hold the potential of positively altering the health and livelihood of a large number of Pakistanis below the poverty line.

“In Pakistan, 44 percent of children under age 5 have stunted growth due to nutritional deficiency. Our high infant mortality rate is associated with malnutrition in mothers. These eggs can add a healthy ingredient to their diets.”

It further reveals as per livestock officials, an estimate of Rs10,000 can be brought in on a monthly basis upon several eggs getting laid by five hens.

Rehman’s institute having produced disease-resistant and hard-hitting chickens through crossing could lead to an easy and affordable rearing of the livestock as well.

Amidst the plethora of critisism, several citizens have also lauded the program for a varying reason centered around the consumption of organic food.

A middle-class housewife from Islamabad named Zahida Shad who is presently looking after half a dozen chickens near her garage.

“People may laugh at the prime minister over this, but I laugh at them. It is a wonderful idea. Here in the city, people have money to spend, but they can’t find a single pure thing to eat.”

On the other hand, a crockery-shop owner from Rawalpindi is also counting down days for the program to launch: “We want the same good food for our children that our parents and grandparents had for us. The problem is, desi eggs cost more and they are hard to find. The others are everywhere.”

The idea put forth by the premier received massive criticism as well in correlation to Bill Gates’ ‘Coop Dreams’ as it was unable to reach its desired outcomes in Africa.

Of the arguments laid out BBC’s Africa business reporter Matthew Davis questioned where the feed and the land will come from once the population expands while adding that the increase would also result to the price falling.

Moreover, prominent development economist Chris Blattman also argued that the plan would prove to be futile due to the training costs of educating families how to raise the livestock.