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Tuesday April 16, 2024

Prevent diabetes by knowing your genes: Here's how

Certain people are more susceptible to certain forms of diabetes due to genetic reasons

By Web Desk
April 01, 2024
Diabetes can be prevented by knowing family genes. — Unsplash/File
Diabetes can be prevented by knowing family genes. — Unsplash/File

Diabetes is a multifaceted illness with multiple forms and an enigmatic etiology. 

A person may have a higher chance of getting the same kind of diabetes if their family has a history of the disease, but they do not necessarily inherit it, according to Medical News Today.

Certain people may be more susceptible to certain forms of diabetes due to genetic reasons. It's possible that a person won't inherit the illness, and there might be strategies to lower the risk. For example, being aware of the effects type 2 diabetes has on family members may motivate someone to take preventative measures.

Furthermore, being aware of one's family history could aid in receiving an early diagnosis. In turn, this can assist someone in avoiding certain issues.

Different forms of diabetes have different roles in genetic variables. For type 2, lifestyle factors seem to have a greater impact than genetics.

An individual can reduce their risk of acquiring diabetes and its complications by being aware of how their environment, lifestyle, and genes affect the condition.

Diabetes type 1 is an autoimmune condition. It happens when healthy cells are unintentionally attacked by the immune system. 

Although a person can develop this type at any age, it typically manifests during adolescence.

Doctors used to think that type 1 diabetes was exclusively hereditary, but not everyone who develops type 1 diabetes has a history of the disease in their family.

Whereas, Diabetes type 2, according to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is the most prevalent kind, making up about 90–95% of all cases of diabetes in the US.

Similar to type 1 diabetes, a person with type 2 frequently has a close relative who also has the disease.