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October 12, 2020

Negative impact of smoking severe in women than men

Islamabad

October 12, 2020

Islamabad : Research proves that negative impact of smoking on women are far more than men as it damages their reproductive health leading to profound problems in menstruation and menopause as well as enhancing the chances of Cervix cancer.

These views were expressed at a seminar titled ‘Role of Women in Prevention of Heart Diseases’ was organised by Pakistan National Heart Association (PANAH). The seminar was attended by women representing a wide range of sectors. Federal Minister for Climate Change Zartaj Gul was the chief guest on the occasion.

Others who attended the seminar included Federal Parliamentary Secretary for Health Dr Noshin Hamid, Chairperson of National Commission for Child Rights (NCCR) Afshan Tehseen Bajwa, Senator Rubina Khalid, Senator Samina Saeed, MPA Farah Agha, MPA Shahida Malik, Pulmonologist Dr. Wajd Ali, famous actress Laila Zubairi, Deputy Secretary General Jamaat-e-Islami Ayesha Syed, Information Secretary Kudsia Mudasser, Senior Vice President Minhaj-ul-Quran Razia Naveed, Minhaj Welfare Director Naheed Mazhar and civil society representatives. PANAH President Major General (r) Masood-ur-Rehman Kayani and General Secretary PANAH Sanaullah Ghumman hosted the event.

Pulmonologist Dr. Wajd Ali highlighted the alarming trend of more and more women and girls taking up smoking. He said that health risks are doubled for women who use conceptive and smoke simultaneously. “There are countries which have started advertising the health campaign for women who are smokers for not to use long term contraceptives.”

Worst of all, he said that women who smoke give birth to children with birth defects. “Even if the husband smokes while the wife is pregnant and she lives in that environment, the chances of developing neonatal and postnatal defects and catching infections are much higher,” he added.