US

POETS’ CORNER

US
By US Desk
Fri, 10, 20

The term poetic license describes the the act by a writer or poet of changing facts or rules to make a story or poem more interesting or effective...


Thoughts

By Sidra Nasir

It reminds me of hope,

It left me in despair,

It makes me strong,

It makes me afraid,

In night’s crown,

In day’s slavery

In summer warmth

In autumn rain,

Meandering thoughts,

Follow my way

Every second of every day.

Hope

By Momina Hassan

Perhaps a single lantern may light the dark

Amidst cacophony of howls and barks

Perhaps a single melody may lead the path

Brace the warrior within yourself

Perhaps words cling onto dwell

Before the shades of silence fall

Perhaps now lift the curtains of melancholic chaos

Look upon the shards of glass

Perhaps the veils of facade

May hark the sirens of hope

Words are betrayals

By Faiza Nasir

From imagined fantasies,

To un-imagined truths

They are romanticized

They hurt us

They heal us

They steal us from us

Then, in melancholic retrospect,

They laugh on us

And leave our hearts abandoned awakened

Poetic license

The term poetic license describes the the act by a writer or poet of changing facts or rules to make a story or poem more interesting or effective.

The term itself comes from Latin. Poetic derives from the Latin poeta, which means “poet” or “maker.” License comes from the Latin licentia, which means “to be permitted.” Basically, poetic license involves the departure of facts or even rules for language in order to create a different effect, usually dramatic, for a piece of work or speech.

The opening stanza of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s famous poem ‘To a Skylark’ is a good example of poetic license. It suggests that the skylark has flown almost all the way up to heaven. Shelley takes even more poetic license by claiming that the skylark is a spirit and not a bird.

Hail to thee, blithe Spirit!

Bird thou never wert,

That from heaven, or near it

Pourest thy full heart

In profuse strains of unpremeditated art.