close
Advertisement
Can't connect right now! retry

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!

World

Web Desk
February 12, 2019

Pakistani-American restaurateur hailed hero for serving free food to poor

World

Web Desk
Tue, Feb 12, 2019

WASHINGTON: Pakistani immigrant Kazi Mannan didn't have even have the slightest of idea that a single good deed will go such a long way.

The esteemed restaurateur who's making waves across the globe with a viral video showcasing him feeding the poor, said he's still in a state of shock, for the response that the video has received insofar.

In an interview with ABC 7, Mannan revealed that the way his goodwill gesture has been hailed is a big achievement that has changed his life in many ways.

"It's a big success that it's changed my life in many ways," Mannan said. "It got so much attention from all over the world. I'm overwhelmed and really excited that this message is going viral. What do we do next?"

Owner of Sakina Halal Grill, the Pakistani-American has been providing food free of cost to the homeless and needy for the last five years at his diner located on K Street in Northwest D.C.

In lieu of his generosity, Mannan estimated they served over 16,000 free meals in 2018. Keeping up with the act, he aims to outnumber the figure this year.

After his video went viral, Mannan's restaurant has been catering to jam-packed customers on Saturday and Sunday, he shared.

He also says he's received tons of emails, phone calls and national media attention.

A number of customers said they had thronged the restaurant because they saw the viral video and wanted to support Mannan's cause.

"A friend of mine on Facebook, who is a chef, shared the story and that's where I saw it," Solimar Santos said. "I said, search no more, that's where I am going."

Meanwhile Mannan hopes to continue his mission and use the restaurant to feed more people.

"I don't want recognition because I am serving humanity until my last breath," he said.