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Wednesday May 29, 2024

Total Solar Eclipse 2024 in pictures

Eclipse began on Mexico's Pacific coast around 11:07 am PDT and progressed eastward, ending in Canada

By Web Desk
April 09, 2024
The moon covers the sun during the eclipse in Magog, Quebec. — AFP
The moon covers the sun during the eclipse in Magog, Quebec. — AFP 

On April 8th, a total solar eclipse swept across North America, casting a shadow from Mexico to Canada. This celestial event, where the moon perfectly aligns between the Earth and the Sun, turned day into night for a brief moment.

In the heart of the excitement was Carbondale, Illinois. The city experienced a sudden drop in temperature as the Sun's warmth was momentarily blocked out. The spectacle began on Mexico’s Pacific coast at around 11:07am PDT, gradually moving northwards.

The eclipse began on Mexico's Pacific coast around 11:07 am PDT and progressed eastward. Even in areas outside the path of totality, a partial eclipse was visible, with the Sun appearing partially covered by the Moon.

Interestingly, Cleveland, one of the few major US cities in the path of totality, had its Guardians' home opener baseball game coincide with the eclipse. The players watched an unusually dark sky, making for a memorable start.

For those lucky enough to witness totality, a rare sight awaited. With proper eye protection, viewers could observe the Sun's corona, its wispy outer atmosphere, and even prominences, giant loops of gas erupting from the Sun's surface. Around the moon's shadow, ruby-coloured dots were visible. These are known as prominences - large loops of gas extending from the sun's surface. They are seen when it is a total eclipse, offering a rare and stunning view.

It was a day when the moon stole the sun's spotlight, if only for a little while.

Watch some of amazing pictures here:

A total solar eclipse can be seen in Svalbard, Norway, on March 20, 2015. — AFP
A total solar eclipse can be seen in Svalbard, Norway, on March 20, 2015. — AFP  


The solar corona glows in visible white light during the total solar eclipse over Mitchell, Oregon, on August 21, 2017, from an image taken during an experiment. — NASA
The solar corona glows in visible white light during the total solar eclipse over Mitchell, Oregon, on August 21, 2017, from an image taken during an experiment. — NASA 


Juan M. Soto Peña, his wife Fabiola and daughter Luciana watch the eclipse from Tucson, Arizona. — Juan M. Soto Peña
Juan M. Soto Peña, his wife Fabiola and daughter Luciana watch the eclipse from Tucson, Arizona. — Juan M. Soto Peña


Native Washingtonians Autumn Spears, left, and Alice Kostovisky catch the solar eclipse in Washington DC, on August, 21, 2017. — Washington Post
Native Washingtonians Autumn Spears, left, and Alice Kostovisky catch the solar eclipse in Washington DC, on August, 21, 2017. — Washington Post  


A street vendor sells certified solar glasses in Pucon, southern Chile, on December 12, 2020.
A street vendor sells certified solar glasses in Pucon, southern Chile, on December 12, 2020. 


People look up at the sun during the total solar eclipse in Niagara Falls, New York. — AFP
People look up at the sun during the total solar eclipse in Niagara Falls, New York. — AFP  


Planetary Society member Richard Canedo took photos of the eclipse in Fredericksburg, — CNN
Planetary Society member Richard Canedo took photos of the eclipse in Fredericksburg, — CNN


Canedo shows off his photos of totality. — CNN
Canedo shows off his photos of totality. — CNN


People look toward the sky at the Edge at Hudson Yards observation deck in New York, on April 8, 2024. — AFP
People look toward the sky at the 'Edge at Hudson Yards' observation deck in New York, on April 8, 2024. — AFP  


The sky darkened as totality passed over Fredericksburg, Texas. — CNN
The sky darkened as totality passed over Fredericksburg, Texas. — CNN


Suzanne Rapley of Santa Barbara, California, traveled to Madras, Oregon, for the 2017 total solar eclipse. — AFP
Suzanne Rapley of Santa Barbara, California, traveled to Madras, Oregon, for the 2017 total solar eclipse. — AFP