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Saturday February 24, 2024

Hong Kong school robotics team beat Pakistan's Zain Ahmad creating world's smallest humanoid robot

World's smallest humanoid robot is 11.3 mm (0.44 in) shorter than typical ballpoint pen

By Web Desk
February 12, 2024
Worlds smallest humanoid robot and Pakistani scientist Zain Ahmad Qureshi. — Diocesan Boyss School/National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences/File
World's smallest humanoid robot and Pakistani scientist Zain Ahmad Qureshi. — Diocesan Boys's School/National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences/File

Four members of the Diocesan Boys' School robotics team in Hong Kong have accomplished a remarkable achievement in engineering as they have successfully broken the record set by Pakistani scientist Zain Ahmad Qureshi in 2022 for the smallest humanoid robot in history.

This robot is 11.3 mm (0.44 in) shorter than a typical ballpoint pen, standing at a meagre 141 mm (5.55 in). Students Aaron Ho Yat Fung, Isaac Zachary To, Justin Wang Tou Duong, and Ngo Hei Leung comprise the creative team behind this creation, according to Interesting Engineering.

The team's humanoid robot received formal recognition from Guinness World Records, and it was highlighted in an episode of their YouTube series Records Weekly.

To make the record-breaking humanoid robot smaller than ever before, the pupils at Diocesan Boys' School had to make sure their creation had an impressive range of articulation. This meant teaching the robot to walk on two feet and articulating its elbows, knees, hips, and shoulders.

The expedition began with the kids using computer-aided design (CAD) to carefully draft the blueprint for their small miracle. After deciding on the technical specs and required parts, they hired a factory to use their experience to create servo motors that met their needs.

These 'servos,' or servo motors, are essential to the operation of the robot. They provide accurate rotation and movement, enabling the robot to deftly use its limbs. 

In order to coordinate these intricate parts, the group purchased a 16-channel servo control board. In addition, they acquired a variety of hardware necessities, such as wiring, batteries, and nuts in addition to screws, according to Guinness.

Inside the school's robotics lab, the students painstakingly assembled the robot's acrylic panels and 3D-printed parts. The team claims that their marriage of state-of-the-art technology and creative design produced an incredibly amazing robotic marvel.