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January 17, 2021

Production of honey from Margalla Hills to start in June

Islamabad

January 17, 2021

Islamabad : The production of fresh and organic honey from the Margalla Hills under the Billion Tree Honey Initiative would start from June 2021.

The latest data showed that the process is in ‘trial phase’ and efforts are underway to ensure the production of high-quality honey in the natural environment of the Margalla Hills.

The local community in the Margalla Hills has been provided with practical knowledge about beekeeping for quality honey production, free pollination services of bees to enhance the quality and quantity of fruits, vegetables, and biodiversity conservation.

According to the climate change ministry, the production of honey would generate thousands of jobs for the local people residing in the villages in the Margalla Hills.

Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC) took initiative in the past to produce quality organic honey from Margalla Hills in collaboration with Capital Development Authority (CDA) and later introduced a tasty brand of ‘Margalla Honey’ that was considered useful for the people especially for allergy patients.

The Metropolitan Corporation Islamabad (MCI) and PARC also inked an agreement last year on bee farming in the Margalla Hills.

According to a statement available on the website of PARC, “Four species of honeybees are found in Pakistan. Three are indigenous and one is imported. These species are present in different ecological areas of the country. The indigenous species are Apis dorsata, Apis cerana and Apis florea. The occidental species is Apis mellifera.”

Special Assistant to the Prime Minister on Climate Change Malik Amin Aslam said about 7,000 beekeepers were now rearing exotic species Apis mellifera in the modern beehives and there were about 300,000 colonies producing 7,500 metric tons of honey annually in the country.