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October 20, 2020

Migratory birds arriving in Margallas ahead of winter

Islamabad

October 20, 2020

Islamabad:The Margalla Hills Range is becoming richer in bird species due to altitudinal bird migration that will continue during the whole winter season.

Influxes of high altitude and migrants from northern latitudes arrive in Margalla Hills Range in autumn. More than 100 species join the 82 resident birds. As autumn passes and winter approaches, 31 species of these visitors migrate further south. However, over 150 species stay during the winter season.

According to the data compiled by the environment wing of the civic authority, the birds migrate south with the arrival of cold weather in the northern latitudes even far beyond the northern boundary. The birds that visit Margalla hills include raptors and even small Passerines like warblers.

There are 218 species of birds in the Margalla Hills Range. Out of these, 82 are resident, 32 summer visiting and breeding species, 73 winter visitors, and 31 transit migrants mainly from and to the Himalayan heights.

A large number of species remain in the Margalla hills in the winter season till the Himalayan foothills begin to experience higher temperatures. The Himalayan birds lingering on in the Margalla hills move up when the temperate zone of the Himalayan Range begins experiencing the change in the season from winter to spring.

They ascend with spring to potential breeding areas in the Temperate and Alpine zones of higher mountains and valleys. At least 32 bird species of the plains from lower latitudes appear in the Margallah hills with the advent of spring. These birds join 82 local bird species and 104 wintering and transit migrant bird species still waiting for better weather in the upper regions. Insectivorous birds or grainivorous birds collect protein-high insect larvae for their nestlings. The role of birds as insect population controllers becomes more apparent during the autumn season.