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Friday April 19, 2024

You can locate Milky Way's black hole anywhere from Earth with this iPhone app

"Galactic Center" is iPhone app made with aid of ChatGPT to locate Milky Way's black hole

By Web Desk
March 04, 2024
This is an artists impression of a runaway supermassive black hole that was ejected from its host galaxy as a result of a tussle between it and two other black holes. — Nasa/File
This is an artist's impression of a runaway supermassive black hole that was ejected from its host galaxy as a result of a tussle between it and two other black holes. — Nasa/File 

Ever wonder where the Milky Way galaxy's centre is located? A recent iPhone app makes finding it simple.

With the aid of ChatGPT, a new app was created that enables users to locate the centre of our own galaxy, according to Interesting Engineering.

The supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) lurks in the centre of the Milky Way, making it an extreme location. The distance between Earth and this black hole is 26,670 light-years.

The massive mass of this black hole is millions of times greater than that of the sun.

However, with the help of "Galactic Compass", a new iPhone software that was developed by Matthew Webb, it can be possibly located.

It was reported to be made available on the Apple App Store on February 15.

This app changes your mobile phone into a quick cosmic guide that always points to the Galactic Center, regardless of where Earth is in space.

The Galactic Center continually shifts as the Earth and its solar system move through space, which also sparked Webb’s curiosity.

Webb attempted to identify the Galactic Center as he moved through space. This enhanced his understanding of the Galactic Center.

“Eventually then I had this picture of myself, and the Earth, and the solar system, and the centre of the galaxy which had initially been whirling round me, and now it had flipped, I was turning around it. It was wildly situating,” Webb wrote on his personal website.

People can place their phones on a flat surface, which allows them to find the Milky Way's core.

The direction of the Galactic Center is indicated by a green arrow that appears on the screen when the app is opened.