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Thursday April 18, 2024

Looking for ways to manage PCOS? These natural foods might help

PCOS cannot be cured, but symptoms can be managed with a balanced diet comprising nutritious foods

By Web Desk
February 22, 2024
A plate of cooked chicken breast, veggies and pasta. — Pixabay
A plate of cooked chicken breast, veggies and pasta. — Pixabay

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal disorder that affects many women of reproductive age which is characterised by high levels of androgens (male hormones) in the body, as well as insulin resistance and irregular menstrual periods.

However, this disorder cannot be cured, but the symptoms can be managed with the help of a balanced diet. Experts recommend PCOS patients increase the use or consumption of nutritious foods that may manage the symptoms and improve overall health.

But what foods are they?

Lean proteins

Lean proteins like chicken, turkey, tofu, fish and legumes are low in saturated fat and may help regulate blood sugar levels.

They promote feelings of fullness, which aid in weight management for women dealing with PCOS.

Leafy greens

A plate of leafy greens. — Unsplash
A plate of leafy greens. — Unsplash

Leafy greens like spinach, kale, and Swiss chard are rich in nutrients like vitamin C, iron, and calcium, and may help reduce inflammation in the body.

They are also low in calories and high in fibre, which can help regulate blood sugar levels and promote weight management.

Berries

This image shows boxes of mixed berries. — Unsplash
This image shows boxes of mixed berries. — Unsplash

Berries like blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries are high in antioxidants, vitamins and fibre, and may help improve insulin resistance.

They have a low glycemic index, meaning they cause a gradual rise in blood sugar levels.

Whole grains 

A bowl of oats and berries. — Unsplash
A bowl of oats and berries. — Unsplash

Whole grains like brown rice, quinoa, and whole wheat bread are high in fibre and complex carbohydrates that may help improve insulin resistance.

They promote satiety, reducing cravings for unhealthy snacks.

Greek yoghurt

A bowl of Greek yoghurt topped with oats and strawberries. — Pixabay
A bowl of Greek yoghurt topped with oats and strawberries. — Pixabay

Greek yoghurt is a rich source of protein and probiotics, which can help support gut health and improve digestion. Opt for plain, unsweetened Greek yoghurt to avoid added sugars.