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Thursday April 18, 2024

Should you follow diet tips going viral on social media? Here is expert advice

Your health deserves a thoughtful approach, free from the pitfalls of quick fixes that flood your social media feeds every single day

By Web Desk
February 22, 2024
Representational image of a social media influencer preparing a social media post. — Pexels
Representational image of a social media influencer preparing a social media post. — Pexels

Have you ever glanced through your social media feeds from social media influencers touting the secret to become a better, fitter version of yourself?

The appeal of quick fixes and fashionable diet suggestions can be overwhelming, especially as particularly when the New Year approaches and we are full of resolutions. What if these seemingly innocent trends included hidden dangers, leading you down a treacherous path of disordered eating?

Let's get to the bottom of the social media diet maze and see if these trends are genuinely beneficial to your health.

As you navigate the digital landscape, one prevalent trend is seed cycling — a practice that aligns the consumption of specific seeds and nuts with the menstrual cycle. The promise of positively influencing hormone levels may sound tempting, but hold on and resist the urge.

Registered dietitian Whitney Trotter urges caution, revealing the lack of scientific backing for this seemingly magical solution.

Now, let's talk gut health. Gut health has become a buzzword among influencers claiming an unhappy gut leads to an unhappy you. Before you embark on a journey to "reset" your gut, consider that restrictive diets talked about on social media can do more harm than good.

Trotter advises seeking guidance from qualified individuals practicing ethical and evidence-based healthcare to safeguard your well-being.

Processed foods and the pursuit of "clean" ingredients also take centrestage.

How often have you felt guilt about your food choices because of social media's relentless messages?

Rachel Engelhart, a registered dietitian and therapist, debunks the myth, asserting that an average portion of processed food might not be the villain it's portrayed to be.

The key lies in context and individual needs, she maintains.

If you spend a part of your life on social media you must have heard the 75 Hard program, a fitness and wellness trend, demanding unwavering commitment.

While daily check-ins may seem empowering, the unforgiving nature of the program raises concerns. Englehart warns against adopting an all-or-nothing mindset, a potential pitfall on the road to a healthier lifestyle.

As you ponder your dietary choices, be cautious of self-appointed health experts on social media. Englehart advises skepticism towards those lacking verifiable credentials or framing food discussions in absolutes of good versus bad. It's crucial to distinguish between genuine health advice and potentially harmful trends.

So, as you embark on your journey to physical well-being, get yourself armed with this knowledge. Remember that the quest for a healthier lifestyle should be grounded in evidence-based practices rather than the allure of fleeting social media trends.

Your health deserves a thoughtful approach, free from the pitfalls of quick fixes.