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Tuesday January 31, 2023

Want to live longer? Drink water

People who maintain a healthy level of hydration have a decreased risk of developing chronic diseases and live longer than those who do not

By Web Desk
January 06, 2023
People who maintain a healthy level of hydration have a decreased risk of developing chronic diseases and live longer than those who do not. — Pexels
People who maintain a healthy level of hydration have a decreased risk of developing chronic diseases and live longer than those who do not. — Pexels

According to recent studies, people who maintain a healthy level of hydration have a decreased risk of developing chronic diseases and live longer than those who do not.

The National Institutes of Health study, which was published in eBioMedicine, examined the health records of 11,255 individuals. Five medical visits over a 30-year span were used to collect the data; the first two took place when the participants were in their 50s and the final occurred when they were between the ages of 70 and 90.

The relationship between participants' serum sodium levels and biological ageing was then examined. Serum sodium levels rise when fluid intake declines. Fifteen health markers, including systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar, were used for evaluation.

According to the study, people who have serum sodium levels over 142 mEq/L are more likely to be prematurely dead and to have biological ages that are older than their actual ages.

In addition, chronic illnesses such as heart failure, stroke, atrial fibrillation, and peripheral artery disease had up to 64% higher associated risk in persons with blood sodium levels above 142 mEq/L. Greater serum sodium levels were also found associated with an increased risk of dementia, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

"The results suggest that proper hydration may slow down ageing and prolong a disease-free life," Health News quoted Natalia Dmitrieva, PhD, a study author and researcher in the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

Researchers point out that the results do not establish a causal relationship. To find out if proper hydration helps fend off chronic illnesses and lengthen life, more research is required.

The amount of water a person needs each day was determined by a 2022 study with 5,604 participants from 26 nations. According to the findings, the average American or European should consume 1.5 to 1.8 litres of fluid daily.

The study also found that the amount of energy required by the body to carry out its fundamental tasks, or energy expenditure, largely determines the ideal water intake.