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Saturday July 20, 2024

'Ancient Egyptians performed advanced surgeries 4,000 years ago'

Groundbreaking study unearths astonishing evidence of surgeries in Pharaoh's era, 4,000 years ago

By Web Desk
May 30, 2024
4,000-year-old skulls unveil Egypt’s advanced surgical techniques. — Tondini, Isidro, Camarós, 2024
4,000-year-old skulls unveil Egypt’s advanced surgical techniques. — Tondini, Isidro, Camarós, 2024

Advanced medical surgery that we know today is nothing new as Egyptians used to perform similar procedures thousands of years ago, according to a recent study.

A team of researchers revealed this in a study published in the journal Frontiers in Medicine on May 29. They described surgical procedures in two 4,000-year-old human skulls.

“We see that although ancient Egyptians were able to deal with complex cranial fractures, cancer was still a medical knowledge frontier,” Tatiana Tondini, a study co-author and researcher at the University of Tübingen in Germany, said.

“We wanted to learn about the role of cancer in the past, how prevalent this disease was in antiquity, and how ancient societies interacted with this pathology.”

One skull, dating back to between 2687 and 2345 BCE, belonged to a male aged 30 to 35 years. The other, from between 663 and 343 BCE, belonged to a female over 50 years of age.

The male skull had a large lesion and about 30 small metastasized lesions scattered across it. The scientists said that cut marks around these lesions suggest that the ancient Egyptians may have performed some form of surgical intervention related to the presence of cancerous cells.

The female skull had a large lesion likely caused by a cancerous tumour, suggesting that cancer was a common pathology in ancient times. This skull also had two healed lesions from traumatic injuries, indicating that the individual might have received treatment and survived.