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Tuesday April 16, 2024

Monica Lewinsky: Bill Clinton's former lover becomes new face of Reformation's vote campaign

"Voting is using your voice to be heard," says Monica Lewinsky for Reformation's vote campaign

By Web Desk
February 28, 2024
Monica Lewinsky arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscars party in Beverly Hills. — AFP/File
Monica Lewinsky arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscars party in Beverly Hills. — AFP/File

Monica Lewinsky, the anti-bullying crusader who caused a media frenzy in the 1990s due to an affair with President Bill Clinton, has been signed by a well-known fashion brand.

Reformation, a womenswear firm, selected Lewinsky to spearhead its most recent voting campaign, according to BBC.

In collaboration with Vote.org, the "You've Got the Power" workwear campaign was introduced on Monday.

"Reminding" people of their voting "power" is the campaign's stated goal.

"Voting is using your voice to be heard, and it's the most defining aspect of democracy," Lewinsky was quoted as saying on the company's website.

"If you wanna complain for the next four years, you gotta go out and vote," she said.

Lewinsky, an author today, started seeing the then-president, who was 27 years her senior when she was just 22 years old. Following the president's initial denial, reports of their relationship dominated US news agendas in 1998 and 1999. 

The president then acknowledged having "inappropriate intimate physical contact" with the intern while working at the White House.

Lewinksy stated in 2018 that Clinton's contact with her amounted to a "gross abuse of power," citing his status as "the most powerful man on the planet... with enough life experience to know better."

Ever since her public return in 2014, she has consistently voiced her opposition to cyberbullying, referring to herself as the "patient zero" of this online phenomenon.

Lewinsky is seen in the Reformation campaign wearing sweaters, a bright red two-piece suit, a leather trench coat, and other business wear.

Reformation notes on its website that "faith in big institutions is pretty low and it's a super important election year."