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Friday July 19, 2024

Rescuers take out 5-foot-long python from a London house

The nanny believed that the snake could have slithered in from the garden through a gap in the wall

By Web Desk
October 03, 2023
This representational image shows a Burmese python which is considered an invasive species. — AFP/File
This representational image shows a Burmese python which is considered an invasive species. — AFP/File

A 5-foot-long python was taken by the rescuers to the wildlife facility after a nanny in a South London home encountered the reptile taking a calm name in the kitchen.

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) helped remove the reptile which can kill human beings.

The rescuer Abigail Campbell told SWNS: "He was slightly skinny."

"I gave him a nudge just to make sure he wasn’t aggressive, but he was very calm and allowed me to pick him up no problem, although he did cling on to the boiler pipe very tightly. He was very strong," Campbell added.

The nanny believed that the snake could have slithered in from the garden through a gap in the wall, while the RSPCA considered the animal escaped or was “abandoned” in the nearby area.

To find whose snake it was, the organisation put up posters however, no one showed up.

"He was very chilled and became somewhat lively once he had been picked up, looking around and smelling the air," Campbell said adding that "he was placed in a snake bag, where he chilled out again, and curled up."

SWNS reported that the animal had been taken to the South Essex Wildlife Hospital.

Reptile knowledge states that pythons are non-venomous nevertheless, some can grow large enough to constrict their owners, which can kill them.

The RSPCA said it has seen many reptiles left behind, explaining that some owners just don’t understand the "commitment" required.

"We believe many people are unaware of how much of a commitment these animals are when they take them on, and we suspect the reality of caring for them has become too much in these cases," Campbell told the outlet.

"This is why we would encourage anyone thinking of getting an exotic pet to find out as much as possible about the animal’s needs and whether they’re the right pet for them."