close
Monday June 24, 2024

Humza Yousaf shares 'special moment' after appointment as Scotland's new leader

Humza Yousaf shifts to Bute House after being confirmed as Scotland's first minister

By Web Desk
March 29, 2023
Newly appointed First Minister of Scotland Humza Yousaf (third left) poses for a picture with family at Bute House on March 28, 2023. — Twitter/@HumzaYousaf
Newly appointed First Minister of Scotland Humza Yousaf (third left) poses for a picture with family at Bute House on March 28, 2023. — Twitter/@HumzaYousaf

Pakistani origin Humza Yousaf, who was appointed as the new leader of Scotland, becoming the youngest and first from a minority ethnic background to lead the country, has shifted to the official residence of the First Minister with family. 

Taking to Twitter, the 37-year-old shared "a special moment" with his family after victory in the parliamentary vote.

The 37-year-old practicing Muslim led the prayer in the Bute House on his first night there after winning the election. Yousaf posted a couple of pictures of himself sitting with his family and leading the prayer at Bute House.

Yousaf's immediate family includes his father Muzaffer Yousaf, mother Shaista Bhutta, wife Nadia and two daughters.

He said that leading the male members of his family into prayer was a customary practice after breaking fast together as it is the month of Ramadan.

"My family and I spending our first night in Bute House after today's parliamentary vote. A special moment leading my family in prayer in Bute House as is customary after breaking fast together," the new Scottish leader said.

Humza Yousaf wins Scottish leadership race

Winning the race of Scottish leadership on Monday, Yousaf became the first ethnic minority leader of a devolved government and the first Muslim to lead a major UK party.

He is also Scotland's youngest leader, taking the helm months after Rishi Sunak became the youngest UK prime minister in modern times when he entered Downing Street aged 42.

The 37-year-old vowed to continue pursuing the SNP's central policy -- independence for Scotland — which Sturgeon has championed since the party lost a 2014 referendum on the issue by 10 points.

"The people of Scotland need independence now, more than ever before, and we will be the generation that delivers independence for Scotland," Yousaf said in his victory speech.

He added his "immediate priority" was protecting Scots from Britain's cost-of-living crisis and reforming public services.

"I will aim to lead Scotland and the interests of all of our citizens, whatever your political allegiance," Yousaf insisted, noting he would look to work "constructively" with the UK's Conservative government.