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Pakistan

Web Desk
April 23, 2019

Naqeebullah Mehsud's wife talks about his death for the first time publicly

Pakistan

Web Desk
Tue, Apr 23, 2019

Naqeebullah Mehsood’s widow Mirqadana has stepped forward for the first time speaking publically about her killed husband, his dreams, the life he lived and the promises he left behind.

In an interview with Geo.tv, speaking about her husband’s life in Karachi after moving from South Waziristan, Mirqadana revealed that he had still been new to the city having moved four months prior.

“He was still finding his feet there, so he would often sleep at his uncle's house or at a friend's. He had a lot of friends, you see, from the odd work he would do at construction sites,” she stated.

She goes on to talk about Mehsud’s interests and the relationship they shared: “He enjoyed getting dressed and taking his own pictures. I would often tease him about how long he took to get ready. I would tell him even brides don't take this long. But he had a lot of followers, or something like that. He would often tell me about them. It would upset me that some of these followers were women.”

Mehsud’s wife goes on to shed light on the strong bond shared between the couple saying: “Naqeebullah wasn't just my husband and caretaker, he was my friend. My best friend. They say such people, such good-hearted people, don't live long. Maybe they are right. I was happy with him. So, I took  care of his things and of him, in whatever ways I could. For which, he would often praise me in front of his friends.”

Moreover, she talked about the dreams and promises that he lived for: “His dream, although he had many, was to open a shop to sell clothes in Karachi. He told me he wanted to rent a shop and dye the clothes himself. Once his business took off, he promised to shift me and the children to the city too.”

“The last time I spoke to him, he asked for a video of his son. Our son had just started walking on his own, without any support, and Naqeebullah wasn't there to see it. I promised to send one soon,” she said.

He had also promised his wife to return to South Waziristan to her before a change in his attitude hinted that he had been troubled about something: “Throughout the conversation, I could sense that he was disturbed. Before shutting the phone, he said that he doesn't know what is happening to him. He can't bring himself to come back home.”

“Those were his last words to me,” she added.

She goes on to state during the interview that she received no calls after that and before she found out he had been taken away by Rao Anwar, she felt ‘angry.’