Advertisement
Can't connect right now! retry

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!

December 8, 2012
Advertisement

Growth in Internet complicated privacy: Leveson

December 8, 2012

Share

SYDNEY: Justice Brian Leveson, who led the inquiry into Britain’s phone-hacking scandal, said Friday the Internet’s growth had complicated debate about mass media privacy, with no easy solution.
Leveson, who last month called for an independent media regulator in Britain, told a privacy symposium in Sydney that there was “an element of mob rule” in identifying people online, and said it was a difficult area to police.
“To name and shame people by broadcasting their behaviour (online), there is a danger of real harm being done, and in some cases harm which is both permanent and disproportionate,” he said.
“There is not only danger of trial by Twitter, but also of an unending punishment, and no prospect of rehabilitation, via Google.” He said too many people were unaware that images and data uploaded online could be stored forever.
“Children and the young do not appreciate that uploading a compromising photograph for a laugh can have consequences for the long-term future,” he said.
“Because once the photograph is in the public domain, it can be found, copied and reproduced, all, again, at the click of the mouse.”
The role of the Internet and social media in Australia has come under the microscope of the government, but Communications Minister Stephen Conroy has admitted it is difficult to do much about US companies operating under US law.

Advertisement

Comments

Advertisement

Topstory

Opinion

Newspost

Editorial

National

World

Sports

Business

Karachi

Lahore

Islamabad

Peshawar