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December 14, 2008
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Tajal Bewas passes away

National

December 14, 2008

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Karachi

A renowned Sindhi language poet, Taj Mohammed Samoo alias Tajal Bewas, died of brain haemorrhage at Liaquat National Hospital on Saturday morning. He was 71.

The deceased — born in Pir Hayat Shah village, Khairpur district— has left behind a widow, four sons, six daughters and a large number of friends and admirers to mourn his untimely demise. He was the author of 44 books—34 published, including a collection of Urdu poetry ‘Andaz-e-Bayan Aur’ and 10 other books under publication. He had also contributed hundreds of articles on various topics, including travelogues, book reviews and forwards of books, which are needed to be compiled.

His commitment to poetry can be gauged from his last engagement to read out a paper on one of the poetry collection of Naseer Soomro on December 4 at the office of Pakistan Academy of Letters, where Bewas suffered a fatal stroke and had been in coma for the last one week. Soomro, a renowned poet and the author of three books, said: “I always saw Tajal Bewas not only as a great poet but a generous human being too. He was aware of the techniques of the poetry and rhythms of music.”

Bewas devoted his entire life to literature. He tried to experiment in all native and modern forms of poetry. He had also written short stories, which were recognised by critics of Sindhi and Urdu literature. He was often invited as the main speaker and guest in combined Urdu and Sindhi Mushairas in different parts of Sindh.

Imdad Solangi, a young poet and Sindhi Adabi Sangat Karachi Secretary said: “Sindh has lost a great son. He was the poet of nature. After late Shaikh Ayaz, Tajal Bewas was the only poet who contributed in Sindhi and Urdu poetry in qualitative and quantitative terms, and gained popularity amongst contemporary poets and critics of both languages.”

Anwer Abro, also a poet and short story writer, said: “Not a single poet, except Tajal portrayed village life, because he

was a keen observer of rural beauty, standing crops and rural life. Tajal’s death ushers in a wave of sadness in Sindh. He will be remembered through his poetry and the lyrical songs that he contributed.”

Sheikh Ayaz called Tajal Bewas as a skilled poet in Sindhi classical form “Bait”.

Before retirement, Bewas served as a bureaucrat at different posts of the provincial and federal governments. He served as an Additional Secretary, Government of Pakistan and Registrar of Companies Government of Sindh.

His admirers have set up a library dedicated to him in Kumb, Khairpur district. He was laid to rest in an archaeological site Chowkandi Graveyard, off National Highway, Karachi—where a large number of poets, writers, friends and family members attended the funeral.

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