Making it a mission to make youth skilled, trained

 
January 20, 2020

Pakistan is among the very few countries that have the youth potential. Up to 60 per cent of our population is made up of under-30 youth but this potential could turn into a risk if left...

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Pakistan is among the very few countries that have the youth potential. Up to 60 per cent of our population is made up of under-30 youth but this potential could turn into a risk if left untapped.

Fortunately, we have able people like Dr Nasir Khan who are committed to utilising this youth potential to the maximum. Executive Director of National Vocational and Technical Training Commission (NAVTTC), Mr. Khan is the right man at the right place.

Driving by the dormant building of NAVTTC in H-9, this scribe was attracted to big posters inviting youth to get vocational and technical training. Asked about the goal that this institution is chasing, Mr. Khan said, “Kamiyab Jawan programme is going to be a game changer. Prime Minister Imran Khan launched it on January 9 and till 24th, we are going to take in applications from across the country.”

“For the first time in history of Pakistan, we are offering a broad range of diplomas and short courses for our youth free of cost,” he said.

Mr. Khan has graduated in Development Studies from New Zealand, which has earned him international exposure. Both his education and exposure are relevant with the office he is holding. He said that all through the world, skills are valued to get jobs. Unfortunately in Pakistan, he said, people do not care to acquire these skills and ranks of the unemployed continue swelling.

“If someone has done an MA in any social sciences subject and he goes to find a job in industry, how can he stand relevant? The employer would ask him about a certain skill to run his machines. So no harm for our university graduates to learn the knowledge that is relevant in the industry so that they can get jobs. We are offering for these graduates high-tech courses in quality institutions,” he said.

He said the skilled Pakistani youth cannot only get good jobs in Pakistan but also in Gulf and European countries. Ministry of Overseas Pakistanis collect demand for skilled workers from all over the countries through the network of Pakistani embassies and missions, where relevant officers are engaged in this job. “As per demand, we try to arrange the required people for these jobs and their supply to the market,” he said.

“We have built a job portal carrying profiles of up to 600,000 professionals. These profiles are selected by international employers through proper channel,” he said.

“There is a big improvement in dispatch of skilled workers to international market now. As compared to the last year, we have dispatched 15 percent more workers abroad this year, which is a major development,” he said.

He said at present, Japan has asked for skilled workers from Pakistan. “We are providing them skilled workers. If these workers meet Japanese standards of work, they will get permanent visas after five years. If they do not, they will come back,” he said. Mr. Khan said his institute is going to attract at least 170,000 youth in Hunarmand Pakistan programme. We believe that achieving this goal is possible for a committed officer like Mr. Khan.

— Hassan Shehzad



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