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AFP
September 17, 2020

India coronavirus cases soar past five million

World

AFP
September 17, 2020

NEW DELHI: Coronavirus infections in India soared past five million on Wednesday, as the EU’s chief warned against “vaccine nationalism” in the frantic global race to battle the disease.

Worldwide cases are rapidly approaching 30 million, with more than 935,000 known Covid-19 deaths, the global economy devastated and nations struggling to contain new outbreaks since the virus first emerged in China late last year.

India, home to 1.3 billion people, has reported some of the highest daily case jumps in the world recently, as a World Health Organisation special envoy described the global pandemic situation as “horrible” and “grotesque”.

The spread of the virus has accelerated in some of the most populous parts of the world such as India, where the latest million infections were detected over just 11 days. And some experts have warned that the total number of cases could be far higher in the vast nation, which has been easing one of the world’s strictest lockdowns recently despite the surge to help its reeling economy.

With scientists rushing to find an effective vaccination seen as the way to end the pandemic, nine candidates are in late-stage human trials—the final stage of clinical testing, according to the WHO.

But the United States has led wealthier nations already buying up millions of doses of promising models, prompting the WHO to call for cooperation to equitably distribute doses to ensure poorer countries have access.

In an implicit swipe at US President Donald Trump’s approach, EU chief Ursula von der Leyen said Europe would lead the world in the search for vaccine and support multilateral bodies like the WHO. “None of us will be safe until all of us are safe — wherever we live, whatever we have,” she said. “Vaccine nationalism puts lives at risk. Vaccine cooperation saves them.” The United States remains the worst-hit nation in the world in terms of both infections and deaths, and Trump is under intense pressure over his handling of the coronavirus crisis.

The Republican leader said on Tuesday that a vaccine may be available within a month — an acceleration of even his own optimistic predictions. “We’re within weeks of getting it, you know—could be three weeks, four weeks,” Trump said during a town hall event broadcast on ABC News.

But experts are worried that world-renowned American institutions responsible for overseeing the approval and distribution of vaccines have become increasingly compromised by political pressure, and corners may be cut to get one ready before the presidential election in November.

Many European countries had started to ease their restrictions after largely bringing outbreaks under control, but are faced with worrying spikes in infections again.

Denmark on Tuesday announced new restrictions, including shorter hours for bars and restaurants, new face mask requirements, and reduced crowds at football matches.

Referring to Europe, WHO emergencies director Michael Ryan warned it was time to “stop looking for unicorns” and take hard decisions to protect the most vulnerable with a potentially deadly winter approaching.