close
Advertisement
Can't connect right now! retry

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!
AFP
July 20, 2019

CA, players’ union welcome concussion subs for Ashes

Sports

AFP
July 20, 2019

SYDNEY: Cricket Australia (CA) has welcomed the introduction of concussion substitutes to international cricket after the International Cricket Council (ICC) approved the rule change in time for next month’s Ashes series.

CA have trialled concussion substitutes in domestic competitions for almost three years and have lobbied the international body to adopt the policy at the highest level. Given cricket has previously disallowed substitute players in the case of all injuries, there have been concerns that players who suffer a concussion during a match will opt to play on given they don’t want to disadvantage their team by leaving them with just 10 players.

Alex Kountouris, Cricket Australia’s Sports Science and Sports Medicine Manager, said introducing concussion substitutes means players are more willing to remove themselves from the game on the advice of medical staff.

“(Substitutes) have allowed medical staff to assess players with suspected concussion during matches free of the pressures of leaving a team one player short,” Kountouris said. “Additionally, the rule will also allow players to declare symptoms of concussion (that can sometimes occur well after the incident), knowing that their team will not be disadvantaged.”

Kountouris added that concussions substitutes have been welcomed by players, coaches and medical staff in Australia’s domestic competitions. From August 1, concussion substitutes will be permitted in all forms of international men’s and women’s cricket and first-class competitions. The medical staff on each team will make the call on concussion replacements, which must be a like-for-like replacement that is approved by the match referee.

The Australian Cricketers’ Association has also welcomed the news, saying it puts player welfare first. “Creating an environment where players feel comfortable in dealing with concussion symptoms is vital for their long-term health and wellbeing,” said ACA chief Alistair Nicholson. “(The rule allows) medical staff to make decisions solely in the interest of players, without the real or perceived pressure of impacting a team and the game.”

Topstory minus plus

Opinion minus plus

Newspost minus plus

Editorial minus plus

National minus plus

World minus plus

Sports minus plus

Business minus plus

Karachi minus plus

Lahore minus plus

Islamabad minus plus

Peshawar minus plus