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World

Web Desk
April 3, 2020

British Pakistani nurse dies of COVID-19 as UK struggles to curb pandemic

World

Web Desk
Fri, Apr 03, 2020
Twitter

BIRMINGHAM: A British Pakistani nurse succumbed to coronavirus  after the country's Prime Minister Boris Jhonson promised to ramp up efforts against the pandemic.

The mother of three, Areema Nasreen, who was described as fit and healthy and had no underlying health conditions, died in the local hospital where she worked for the last 17 years.

The 36-year-old of Walsall was serving at Walsall Manor Hospital where she contracted the virus and since then was admitted to the same hospital. She was kept in intensive care and it was believed that she was recovering but in the early hours of Friday her condition deteriorated and she passed away.

Tributes flooded in once the news of her death was confirmed by family members. Her heartbroken sister Kazeema, who works at the same hospital said: “I lost my amazing sister, how will I live without her? We did everything together. She left me alone.”

Renowned broadcaster and TV personality Piers Morgan termed Nasreen an “absolute heroine”. Taking to Twitter, the host of ITV’s "Good Morning Britain" and former newspaper editor said: “RIP Areema Nasreen, 36. An NHS nurse for 16yrs, loving wife & mother of 3 young children. Killed by #coronavirus that she contracted at Walsall Manor Hospital as she fought to save others’ lives. An absolute heroine.”

West Midlands Mayor Andy Street, urging the public to follow the government advice to help the NHS staff, said: “Such tragic news this morning, my heart goes out to Areema’s family and three children. Frontline workers across the West Midlands are risking their lives day after day to protect us, the least we can do to help them is follow government advice.”

Extending his “deepest sympathies” to Nasreen’s family on behalf of the Royal College of Nursing, its director Mike Adams said: “To lose anyone to this terrible virus is a tragedy. To lose a nurse like Areema is particularly difficult. She was well-loved by her colleagues and admired for her dedication to her patients. As an RCN Cultural Ambassador, she will be remembered and celebrated as a leading figure in the West-Midlands nursing community.”

English football star Stan Collymore described her death as another example of “heroism” and “dedication” of NHS staff making ultimate sacrifice.

Richard Beeken, Chief Executive of Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust said she was “extremely committed to her role as a staff nurse”. He added she did make a difference.

In a message on social media, friend and nurse at Birmingam City Hospital, Rubi Aktar described her as the loveliest, genuine person one could ever meet.

Nasreen developed symptoms of the coronavirus on March 13 and later tested positive for COVID-19. Subsequently, she was admitted to the same hospital where she was performing her duties. So far, she is the youngest medic to die after catching the virus.