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AFP
June 6, 2006
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Iran pledges to examine world N-proposal

Sports

AFP
June 6, 2006

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TEHRAN: Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki said Monday the Islamic republic’s leadership would examine an international proposal aimed at resolving a crisis over their disputed nuclear programme.

Speaking at Tehran’s Mehrabad airport, where he was awaiting the arrival of European Union foreign policy chief Javier Solana, Mottaki said a deal was possible but only if Iran’s “demands” were met.

“If their aim is not to politicise the issue and if they take our demands into consideration, we can reach a reasonable agreement,” Mottaki told reporters. Mottaki said Solana would hand the proposal, drawn up by Britain, France and Germany, and backed by the United States, Russia and China, to top Iranian national security official Ali Larijani on Tuesday.

“Tommorow Mr Solana will meet Larijani and present the proposal to him. We will examine this proposal and give our reply after the end of the defined period,” Mottaki said, without saying how long Iran had been given to respond. Western officials have said they want a response within several weeks.

The big powers are offering trade and technology incentives and fresh multilateral talks, involving the United States, on condition that Iran suspend sensitive uranium enrichment work-something that Iran has so far refused to do.

“From their point of view, their proposals are complete. But our point of view can help in completing these proposals,” Mottaki said, calling for “our meetings and replies to be taken into account” after Solana’s visit.

“We advise our European friends not to make the same errors as last year and not to take decisions without taking into account the positions of the Islamic republic,” he added, referring to a previous EU offer of incentives in exchange for a freeze on sensitive nuclear work. Iran denies that it wants to make nuclear weapons, and says it wants to enrich uranium only to the level needed for civilian

reactors.

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