close
Advertisement
Can't connect right now! retry

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!

add The News to homescreen

tap to bring up your browser menu and select 'Add to homescreen' to pin the The News web app

Got it!
September 26, 2014

Cop shoots blasphemy convict in Adiala jail

National

A
APP
September 26, 2014

RAWALPINDI: A British national of Pakistani origin, who was awarded the death penalty in a blasphemy case, was critically wounded in Adiala Jail when a cop on duty opened fire at him without any provocation as he came out of his death cell on Wednesday morning, jail and police sources said.
The victim, identified as Asghar Ali, was awarded the death sentence under the blasphemy law for sacrilege of the Holy Prophet (PBUH) and had allegedly claimed to be a prophet himself.At about 11.00am, Asghar Ali, resident of Sadiqabad, Rawalpindi, was wounded seriously after sustaining multiple bullet injuries in Adiala Jail, Rawalpindi, when Constable Muhammad Yousaf of the Elite Force of the Rawalpindi police opened fire at him with his official gun, official sources at the Adiala Jail said. The attacking cop surrendered himself before the jail administration, who later handed him over to Saddar Bairuni police.
The victim, Asghar Ali, was awarded the death sentence by a court of law in a blasphemy case for showing disrespect to the Holy Prophet (PBUH), the police sources said, adding that the Sadiqabad police had lodged an FIR against the person under the blasphemy act of the Pakistan Penal Code (PPC) 295-C and arrested him.
The police later submitted the challan of the case before the court of the District and Sessions Judge Naveed Iqbal who awarded him a death sentence after recording statements of witnesses as well as people from complainant and defendant parties.
The police, quoting jail administration, said that Asghar Ali was taken out of the death cell as a routine under the protection of Muhammad Yousaf of the Elite Force equipped with sub machine gun (SMG). As he came close to the cop, he opened fire at him and riddled him with bullets, adding that the victim was taken to jail hospital and later shifted to District Headquarters (DHQ) Hospital where a team of surgeons were trying to save his life.
Earlier, in similar occurrence, Punjab Governor Salman

Taseer was gunned down on January 3, 2011 at Kohsar Market located in F-6/3, Islamabad by one of his security guards who later surrendered himself. He later explained that he had killed Mr Taseer because of his criticism of the blasphemy law.
While, a group of gunmen shot dead federal minister for minorities Shahbaz Bhatti on 1st March, 2011, near I-8 Markaz, about two months after the assassination of Selman Taseer on the demand of reforming blasphemy laws.Reuters adds: A Pakistani policeman shot two men in jail killing one accused of blasphemy and wounding another condemned to death on the same charge, lawyers and an activist said.
Christian pastor Zafar Bhatti was killed and 70-year-old Briton Muhammad Asghar, who has a history of mental illness, was wounded in the attack in Rawalpindi. Bhatti, who worked to protect the human rights of the Christian minority, was on trial after an Islamic leader accused him in 2012 of sending text messages derogatory to the Prophet Mohammed’s (SAW) mother. His family says police investigations show the phone was registered to someone else. In recent weeks, Bhatti had received death threats in prison from both inmates and guards, his family told Pakistan-based human rights group ‘Life for All.’ He was being held in the same cell as Asghar. “This is a barbaric act. There had been threats. The court should have instructed police to ensure Bhatti’s safety,” said Xavier Williams of Life for All. “Killing of a person who was falsely accused is mockery of the judicial system. The protectors of the innocent have become the predators. “Asghar, from Edinburgh, was arrested in 2010 and sentenced to death in January after a disgruntled tenant presented letters he had written saying he was a prophet. Asghar had previously been detained under the mental health act in Britain and diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, according to documents his lawyers supplied to Reuters. His lawyers were barred from attending the last a few months of his trial. The law firm asked not to be identified for fear of being targeted by extremists.