Doctors, nurses leave homes to protect families from virus

April 07, 2020

ST. PAUL, Minnesota, US: Lisa Neuburger was caring for a patient with the coronavirus when the person’s ventilator tube became detached.As she worked to help the patient, she knew fluid from...

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ST. PAUL, Minnesota, US: Lisa Neuburger was caring for a patient with the coronavirus when the person’s ventilator tube became detached.

As she worked to help the patient, she knew fluid from the person’s lungs could be spraying into the air, possibly exposing her to the virus, despite the protective gear she was wearing. That’s when the 37-year-old nurse and mother got scared for her family.

“I couldn’t sleep that night. I thought, ‘If I brought this home to my mom, she’s probably going to die, and it’s probably going to be my fault.’ So I had to find a different way,” Neuburger said.

To protect her family, Neuburger moved from her parents’ home, where she had been living with her son after a recent divorce, and into a camper. Even though she doesn’t know when she’ll be able to hug her 11-year-old boy again, she’s glad she chose to self-isolate — especially since she began feeling sick five days after that hospital scare. Holed up in the camper as she awaits the results of a COVID-19 test, Neuburger is among countless doctors and nurses around the world who are choosing to move to hotels, tents, garages and other temporary housing to protect their loved ones — even as they risk exposing themselves to a virus that has claimed tens of thousands of lives, including a number of medical workers. Hotels, some business owners and people who run Airbnb rental homes are among those offering lodging, sometimes for free, to doctors and nurses needing to self-isolate.



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