Haris Rauf recalls how he would make ends meet before stardom

After matriculation, I used to work in the market selling snacks [nimco] on Sundays to be able to pay my fee, says Haris Rauf

By Web Desk
October 02, 2023
Haris Rauf celebrates after taking the wicket of Nepal's Sompal Kami (not pictured) during the Asia Cup 2023 cricket match between Pakistan and Nepal at the Multan Cricket Stadium in Multan on August 30, 2023. — AFP

Before being noticed by the Pakistan Super League (PSL) team Lahore Qalandars, Haris Rauf was a kid with extreme pace who was just trying to make ends meet but his life took a sudden turn when he was spotted by the franchise.

In an ESPNCricinfo documentary, the Pakistan star pacer Haris Rauf disclosed how he used to pay his school and, later on, university fees during the tough times he and his family faced.

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Haris Rauf has emerged as the top Pakistan bowler in white-ball cricket since his debut in January 2020.

He was found by the Lahore Qalandars Players Development Program (PDP) in Gujranwala after clocking 92.3mph in the trials.

Haris has seen many ups and downs due to their family being not so financially stable and he had to cover his expenses by selling snacks and playing tape-ball cricket across Pakistan.

"After matriculation, I used to work in the market selling snacks [nimco] on Sundays to be able to pay my fees. The rest of the week, I would attend school and academy," Haris revealed to ESPNCricinfo.

"When I enrolled in university, my father was not earning enough to be able to pay my fees and I couldn't afford it too but by playing tape-ball cricket I would easily manage my fees," he maintained it was him who paid Rs70,000 to 80,000 per semester.

"The boys who play tape-ball professionally in Pakistan, easily make around 2-2.5 lakh per month. I used to earn that and would give to my mother but I never told my father about earning this much," he maintained.

Meanwhile, Haris emphasised money was always a big struggle for his family during his teenage years.

"My father has three brothers and all lived together. My father had one big room and when my uncles got married, my father gave his room to his brothers. Eventually, we reached the point where we were sleeping in the kitchen," the 29-year-old added.

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