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Friday, July 05, 2013
From Print Edition
 
 

 

Islamabad

 

The hilly areas and northern regions of Pakistan attract over 30,000 to 40,000 local tourists after rise in mercury in different parts of the country offering them to spend some time for holidays in chilly weather.

 

“Normally the tourism season remains at peak till the end of August in the Northern Areas while this year, the season will not witness a peak due to Ramadan starting before the mid of July,” said Manager Publicity and Promotion, Pakistan Tourism Development Corporation (PTDC), Tayyab Mir, while talking to this agency here Thursday.

 

He said around 10,000 tourists enter Queen of Hills Murree, Ayubia and Galiaat on week-days while their number multiplies on weekends as the same route touches to Azad Kashmir which is also considered a popular tourist spot in summer.

 

The same number of tourists is witnessed at Kaghan Valley as those tourists who want to explore picturesque landscapes such as lakes, rivers, greenery and other heavenly glimpses prefer to visit Naran and other popular spots of Kaghan Valley.

 

The tourists throng these popular spots with the start of summer vacations and families belonging to warm regions move to mountainous regions.

 

Those living in twin cities, consider Murree Hills as most accessible tourist spot, which is the basic reason for increase in number of tourists on weekends, he said, adding “the season is ideal for tourism as the nature lovers spend their time in mountains for leisure activities to admire the beauty of these areas in terms of ideal climate and clean air, varied topography, beautiful scenery, local traditions and simple life styles.”

 

Besides this, the weekends before Ramazan have witnessed a huge increase in the number of visitors at Kaghan valley, which is creating accommodation crisis as the PTDC motels and local hotels were not expecting this huge number and there was limited accommodation.