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Muttahida Bain-ul-Muslimeen Forum comprising 14 scholars belonging to different sects formed at MQM conference
 
 
Shamim Bano
Sunday, September 02, 2012
From Print Edition
 
 

 

Karachi

 

At a time when sectarian violence is escalating in the country, religious scholars belonging to different sects have joined hands and gathered on a single platform in an attempt to promote interfaith harmony.

 

The 14-member Muttahida Bain-ul-Muslimeen Forum, comprising leading religious scholars including Moulana Tanveer-ul-Haq Thanvi and Allama Abbas Kumaili, was formed on Saturday at the Ittehad Bain-ul-Muslimeen Conference held at Lal Qila Azizabad. The event was organised by the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) on the instructions of its chief, Altaf Hussain.

 

Allama Haider Alvi, Allama Mufti Mehmood Rizvi, Mirza Yousuf Hussain, Hafiz Allama Qari Jamil Rathore, Qari abdul Rehman, Allama Syed Hashmi Moosvi, Amir Abdullah Farooqui, Agha Sajjad Karbalai, Allama Zuhair Abidi, Allama Ferozuddin Rehmani, Mufti Mohammad Arif Saeedi, Waqar Mohammed and Mufti Abdullah Naqvi are the other members of the forum.

 

Edict

 

The forum issued an edict, prepared with the unanimous consent of other religious scholar present at the conference, prohibiting the killing of innocent people and declaring that the crime was illegitimate, unlawful and tantamount to the murder of humanity.

 

The scholars asked MQM chief Altaf Hussain to head the forum. However, Hussain asked them to form an executive council with the representation of different schools of thought and convene its meeting.

 

Different resolutions were also unanimously passed at the event that termed the “deplorable sectarian and ethnic killings a deep-rooted conspiracy against the country”.

 

The participants of the conference condemned the sectarian killings in Gilgit and Quetta and the attacks on shrines and other religious sites. They maintained that all citizens of the country, whether they were Christians, Sikhs or Hindus, were equal and it was the responsibility of the government to provide them with protection.